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Ogden, Salt Lake City
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23 Aug 2017
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

How to Grow Potted Plants

You want to take advantage of a change of color and scenery incorporate your favorite potted plants on the outer edges of wide steps. Siting containers in well-traveled areas, such as entries, gives them greater impact. These are portable, easy to change up and with a drip-line the perfect addition with no maintenance at all (just remember to put a hole in the pot – ask me Adam’s wife, Jyl, I learned the hard way on this one 🙂

It also often contains weed seeds. Make or buy a soil-less mix — one composed of peat moss or coconut fiber (coir), vermiculite or perlite, and other ingredients. A lightweight soil for potted plants needs to provide good drainage, hold moisture, and give roots room to grow.

Every plant needs the right soil, water, light, and fertilizer, but container-grown plants need a little bit more attention from a caregiver than those grown in the ground. Here’s our guide to success with potted plants.

Soil for Potted Plants

Container plants should be grown in a special potting mix that doesn’t contain soil. Garden soil is too heavy and may compact roots, cutting off their oxygen. It also often contains weed seeds.

Make or buy a soilless mix — one composed of peat moss or coconut fiber (coir), vermiculite or perlite, and other ingredients. A lightweight soil for potted plants needs to provide good drainage, hold moisture, and give roots room to grow.

Garden Tip: Most orchids are the exception to this rule. They need a potting medium that gives even better air circulation than the typical soilless mix. Bark chunks are used for potting some orchids, while other types need only a slatted wooden basket or a slab of wood.

Watering Potted Plants

Water and drainage play a key role in success with container plantings. Poor watering practices — especially overwatering — kill more potted plants than anything else.

One easy rule: Use room-temperature water when possible. Cold water can harm roots and foliage, and hot water can kill plants instantly. Also, allow tap water to sit for several hours to evaporate any dissolved chemicals. Softened water contains sodium that can accumulate in the soil and burn plant roots when used over time. Use an outdoor tap for plant water, or install a tap for watering plants before the point where the line enters the softener.

Watering plants in the morning allows any moisture on the foliage to evaporate before evening; foliage that remains cool and wet during evening and nighttime hours is more prone to disease. This is especially important for disease-prone plants such as tomatoes and roses.

Another must: Containers need drainage holes so plants are not left sitting in water. You can place saucers under pots to catch and hold rain or extra water, but remove any excess water left after about an hour to prevent root rot and excessive sogginess in the soil.

Before watering always check soil moisture by poking your finger into the soil. Only water if the soil feels dry. Wet soil can be tricky, because when roots drown and die, the overwatered plant often droops, making you think it needs more water. Checking the soil moisture prevents you from compounding the problem with even more water.

If a plant has dried out completely, submerge the pot in water to its rim to allow the soil to soak up moisture from the top and the bottom. Submerging is usually an easy way to water dried-out hanging plants as well; use a tub or sink, and leave the pot there until air bubbles have stopped appearing.

How often do you need to water? That depends on the type of plant, the size of the pot, the weather, and other factors. Outdoor containers might need watering as often as once or twice a day during hot, dry weather but much less during cooler, cloudy conditions. As a general rule, the larger the container for your potted plants, the less watering you’ll need to do. The container material matters, too: A plant in a porous clay pot needs water more frequently than one in a plastic or ceramic pot.

Various types of plants have different watering requirements: Think about the differences between cacti, which prefer infrequent watering, and cannas, which prefer constantly moist soil. In general, plants with a lot of leaf surface or soft, lush foliage are thirstier than those with less foliage or waxy leaves. Plants with silver, fuzzy leaves also typically need less water.

A general rule: It is better to water less often and more deeply than to offer light, frequent waterings.

Planting Containers

Outdoor containers, in general, should be at least 12 inches wide and 10 inches deep. The bigger the pot, the more room is available for roots, so the better your plants will perform.

Large potted plants need larger containers, and small ones should go into smaller containers. Mixed containers often look best when you use a large container and include graduated heights and variety in foliage texture.

Light Requirements

All plants depend on light for their survival, and making sure your potted plants get the right amount of light is key to keeping them happy. For both indoor and outdoor containers, group plants with similar light requirements. Don’t mix shade lovers with sun lovers in a single pot; one or both of them will be unhappy, depending on where you place the pot.

Fertilizing Potted Plants

Every time you water a potted plant, nutrients leach out of the drain holes along with the excess water. An easy way to deal with fertilization is to use time-release organic fertilizers. Soil microbes activate organic fertilizers, which slowly release their nutrients to plants.

Compost and rotted mature improve soil drainage and add nitrogen — needed for healthy foliage — and other nutrients. Other sources of nitrogen include blood meal, cottonseed meal, fish meal, and fish emulsion. Plants also need rock phosphate and potash.

Buy bags of premixed, balanced (the numbers on the bag should match, such as 10-10-10) organic fertilizer and use it in addition to organic amendments to build healthy soil for your pots. Follow label directions for amounts to use in containers. Feed when you plant, then monthly after that.



09 Jul 2017
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Energy-Efficient Landscaping Tips

Sitting under a shade tree on a hot day makes you cooler, and standing by a wall on a cold, windy day makes you feel warmer. It seems pretty obvious. What’s less obvious is that you can landscape your yard to offer your home those same benefits. It just takes a bit of planning in the way you site trees, fences, and other elements.

Use these landscaping tips to keep your energy costs down and make your yard more environmentally friendly.

  • A well-positioned tree can save up to 25 percent of your home’s energy for heating and cooling.
  • A tree-shaded yard can be up to 6 degrees cooler than a sunny yard. A shaded lawn can be up to 25 degrees cooler than sunny pavement.
  • Shading your home’s roof can increase your air conditioner’s energy efficiency by more than 10 percent.
  • A single shade tree equals the cooling power of 15 air conditioners — and it runs for free!
  • Three house-shading trees can cut your cooling bill by as much as half.
  • Windbreaks can cut winter heating bills by 10 to 30 percent.

Regional Strategies for Energy-Efficient Landscaping

The Northeast: In most of your region, you want to take advantage of the sun’s heat during the winter, so plant deciduous trees on the south- and west-facing sides of your home. This will do double duty: In summer, their leafy canopy will shade your house, helping to keep it cooler. It’s also helpful to use a windbreak of trees or large shrubs to the north or northwest side of your home. This block will prevent winter winds from stealing as much of your home’s heat.

The Midwest: The hot, blazing sun can make Midwestern summers uncomfortable. Help your air conditioner by planting large deciduous trees on the south or west side of your home. To reduce the heating costs during cold winter months, allow sun’s rays to reach the south and west sides of your home. If possible, grow a windbreak of trees or shrubs on the north or northwest side of your house.

The High Plains and Mountain West: Enjoy all those sunny winter days knowing your furnace is working less if the sun can shine on your home, providing radiant heat. We know that in many areas it’s not feasible, but plant a windbreak if you can on the north side of your home. In summer, using deciduous trees on the sunny side of your house casts welcome shade.

The Pacific Northwest: Let the sun work for you: On those rare sunny winter days, its radiant heat can help your furnace if its warm rays can reach your house, so avoid planting evergreens on the south or southwest side of your home. Instead, select deciduous trees that lose their leaves in winter; they’ll give the added benefit of shading your home from the hot sun in summer.

The South: Pay attention to the breeze and use fences or shrubs to help direct cooling breezes at your house. Likewise, help stop the sun from turning your home into an oven by planting large evergreen trees on the south or southwest side of your home. Decrease the effect of the humidity by planting drought-tolerant plants next to your home. Avoid siting thirsty plants next to your house; they’re better suited for other corners of your yard.

The Southwest: While summer heat can be intolerable, lessen its affect on your air conditioner by planting shade trees on the sunniest sides of your home. Because summer breezes are so rarely cool, use windbreaks to block the wind around your home.

Southern California: Unless you’re lucky enough to live on the coast where it seems like the weather is always nice, you’ll want to combat summer heat by planting big shade trees on the south and southwest side of your home. Also take a look at blocking those warm summer winds: Plant windbreaks around your home to deflect them.

Landscape to Reduce Winter Heating Costs

Minimize heating bills by doing the following:


  1. Plant evergreens to block cold northwest winter winds. A windbreak protects an area up to 10 times as far out as its height — so a series of 30-foot-tall trees can shield a 300-foot-wide area. Dense windbreaks can cut wind speed by 85 percent. Together these two effects can cut your winter heating bills by 25 percent.
  2. Place plantings, walls, or berms near — but not against — your home to create dead air space. This space acts as an insulator, slowing the escape of heat from your home.
  3. Plant deciduous trees, especially on the south side of a house. They can screen 70 to 90 percent of the hot summer sun yet allow breezes through. Deciduous trees also allow welcome winter sun to filter through the branches once they’re bare. Deciduous vines serve the same purpose but, since they’re smaller, do so to a lesser degree.
  4. Create open lawn areas on the south side of your home. These green, open areas create an area for snow to accumulate. The light reflected off the snow and onto your house can offer a radiant heating effect.
  5. Build a tall fence to slow winter winds. Not only will it lower heating bills, it will provide protection for less cold-hardy plants.
          ACG Tip: Semi-open fences that allow some air movement through them are the most effective. Solid fences divert air over them with too much force and create an effect like a wind tunnel.
  6. Design stone or concrete surfaces around your home, such as a patio. It can soak up heat during the day and reflect it during a cool evening.

Landscape to Reduce Summer Cooling Costs

Maximize your air conditioner’s efficiency by doing the following:


  1. Build a pergola, ramada (a shade shelter open on three sides), awning, or other shade-giving structure on the west side of your house. It’s an attractive way to filter light during the hottest part of the day. An open structure, such as a vine-covered pergola, is ideal as it allows cool breezes through and doesn’t trap heat.
  2. Position porches, decks, and patios on the east side of your home. They’ll become an ideal gathering spot because of their early morning warmth. And they won’t be sauna-like during the late-day heat. A shade tree will keep the area even cooler.
  3. Think about your groundcovers. Light-colored stone or granite mulch and concrete will reflect more heat, making things hotter. Darker stone and wood chips will absorb the heat. A lawn or expanse of groundcover plants is the most cooling of all, but may require lots of water.
  4. Place trees where they’ll shield your windows, especially those on the south and west sides, from direct sun. Deciduous trees are a great option as they block sun during hot weather but allow sunlight to filter through during cooler weather once their branches are bare.
  5. Funnel breezes through your property. Plant a row of trees on one side of the house and a wall on the other side of the house, to create a wind tunnel, for example. This will encourage stronger cooling breezes through the property and around the house.
  6. A water feature is cooling both physically and psychologically. A large pond upwind will noticeably cool the air of your whole landscape. A small pond or fountain can cool a smaller area.
  7. Plant a cluster of trees to act as a low-tech air conditioner for the entire property, creating a cool zone which breezes can then distribute throughout the property and around the house.

Small-Scale Tips

  • Take time to study the movement of sun and wind around your house and property through the seasons. You’ll then be better able to control them with plantings and structures.
  • Control sun through just a window or two by planting annual vines. Create a trellis of galvanized wire or build one of wood to surround or even cover the window. Plant with a deciduous vine, such as a sweet autumn clematis, morning glories, or scarlet runner bean. The vine’s leaves will create filtered shade during the summer but allow light in during winter.
  • Concentrate more on depth than height when planting a windbreak. One row of trees is good but two is better, and three is best. Start with a row of low-growing flowering trees and shrubs closest to the house, a row of taller deciduous trees in the next row, and a row of tall evergreens farthest out.
  • Plant windbreaks on the north and northwest side of the house. Keep in mind, however, that in cold-winter areas you may well want the warming rays of the afternoon sun on the west side of your home. Plant a west windbreak far enough away to allow the low, slanting afternoon winter sun to reach the house.
  • Berms are a great windbreak booster and can further help channel cold winter winds up and over a house.

Check with ACG Sprinklers for more information.  With the right lawn services applied at the right time, you can maximize your efforts in maintaining a green, healthy lawn and landscape you’ll love all spring and summer long.

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11 Apr 2017
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Residential and Commercial Lawn Maintenance Service

Keep Your Home or Business’ Lawn Beautiful Without the Hassle

We provide residential and commercial lawn care maintenance. We also provide care services ranging from lawn mowing to fertilization to cleaning up your yard. . If you are interested in scheduling regular landscaping and lawn care services, contact our experts at ACG Sprinklers. Keeping your lawn green, vibrant, healthy, and free of weeds is a job for experts. Our team provides regular services designed to ensure that your lawn stays looking its best all year-round.

Our residential and commercial landscaping services include the following:

We Treat Your Landscaping As If It Were Our Own

Our team of lawn care experts at ACG Sprinklers is prepared to help you keep your home or business looking beautiful all year long. We abide by our “C.A.R.E.” core values: Customers first, Attitude, Respect, and Enjoy life in the process. Our customers trust us to put their interests first and to provide top-of-the-line service designed to keep their landscaping green, healthy, and pest and weed free through-out all the seasons.

How are we different than the other companies out there:

We provide several different programs within our lawn and bed maintenance service:

  • Organic lawn care (available in most markets)
  • Hybrid lawn care (available in most markets)
  • Traditional lawn care

Organic Lawn Care

Our organic lawn care program utilizes 100% safe, environmentally friendly products. Regular fertilizers can have toxic traces that may accelerate the loss of biological diversity. Our organic fertilizers sustain healthy soil as they are made from natural materials, including plant, animal, and mineral sources.

More facts about our organic fertilizers include:

  • Safe for people and animals
  • Environmentally friendly
  • Rich in soil nutrition
  • Promotes soil micro-organisms
  • Lawns require less mowing
  • Promotes disease and pest resistance, building natural defense systems / soil structure
  • Minimizes soil erosion
  • Better drainage

Hybrid Lawn Care

The ACG Sprinklers hybrid lawn care program combines the best of both worlds: the weed control of traditional lawn care methods and the safety and eco-friendly power of organic fertilizer.

Learn more about our hybrid lawn care program:

  • Still a safe option for protecting pets, people, and the environment
  • Conducive to long-term nutrition
  • Eliminates drought stress
  • Builds the soil’s natural defense
  • Keeps micro-organisms in the soil, though they are somewhat reduced due to the chemicals
  • Promotes less frequent mowing
  • Keeps weeds at bay using traditional chemicals

Traditional Lawn Care

Our traditional lawn care program prioritizes faster results rather than the slow-building organic treatments which take effect over longer periods of time.

Facts about our traditional lawn care program include:

  • Faster results
  • More cost effective
  • Not as safe for people and pets, less environmentally friendly
  • Requires moderation, as build-up can damage soil
  • Lower levels of soil micro-organisms

Contact our landscaping and lawn care service pros for a free consultation.

Enjoy a beautiful lawn through the seasons without the hassle! For immediate response contact 435-232-8851 via call or text.
We’re here to help you learn more about our services.

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22 Feb 2017
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Spring Clean-Up Service

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Professional Services

Cleaning up your property for spring is a big job. Our team can handle it for you. We are landscaping and lawn care service experts with programs catered to both residential and commercial properties. We understand that your time is valuable and limited. Let us take care of your spring cleaning so that you can enjoy a beautiful, season-ready property without the hassle.

What does spring cleaning involve?

Our spring clean-up service involves numerous aspects such as:

  • Clearing away leaves, branches, and clutter
  • Hauling away and composting debris
  • Mowing the grass
  • Re-edging and cleaning garden and flower beds
  • Redefining the borders of the lawn
  • Re-seed damaged areas of the lawn
  • Pruning and trimming trees and shrubs
  • Fertilizing

These aren’t all of our services — just a few. In fact, whatever it takes to get your lawn looking its best, our team of lawn care and landscaping experts can take care of it! Speak with our spring clean-up crew about scheduling an appointment to get your property looking its seasonal best.

Our team is experienced, timely, and professional. We’ll show up to your home in an ACG Sprinkler T-shirt and always with a smile. You may not have the extra time to spend cleaning and organizing your property after the cold months, but we can take care of it for you.

Don’t waste time — call ACG Sprinklers today at (435) 232-8851!

Why wait to enjoy the full beauty of spring on your property? Set up an appointment now! The ACG Sprinklers are your best choice for seasonal landscaping and lawn care servicing. When you call us to schedule a time for us to meet with you, you’ll find that we are friendly, courteous, and knowledgeable.


18 Aug 2016
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Top 5 – Perennials for Our Utah Summers

Wondering what flowers are perfect for our Utah summers? Here are our top 5 favorites:

  1. Blue-eyed Grass Wild Flower Seed. Blooms in summer. A Utah native species. Under scrub oakBlue-eyed Grass Wild Flower Seed. Blooms in summer. A Utah native species. Under scrub oak:
  2. Little Bluestem Grass is an excellent native grass that can be grown in Utah! It is considered a North American prairie grass and is found…New Utah Gardener: Little Bluestem Grass - Schizachyrium scoparium - ...:
  3. Flax – one hearty plant that come up year after year – and the deer won’t eat it! Sun/Part Sun, Zones 5-9, Perennial, 2 x 2 feet. Blooms late summer.Flax - one hearty plant that come up year after year - and the deer won't eat it! Sun/Part Sun, Zones 5-9, Perennial, 2 x 2 feet. Blooms late summer.:
  4. Red Creeping Thyme. Grows 3 inches tall max – no mowing . Lemony scent. Gorgeous with lavender. Perennial. Repels mosquitoes. Can grow as entire lawn.BULK 1,000 Seeds, Creeping Thyme, Walk on Me, Perennial Flower, Lemon Scent:
  5. Slender, wiry blades of blue characterize blue fescue plants. The ornamental grass is a tidy evergreen that is very tolerant of a wide range of sites and conditions. This plant is one of the “no fuss” plants perfect for the low maintenance garden. Choose a sunny location when planting blue fescue.Blue Fescue:
15 Aug 2016
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Pollinator Promise by Scotts

  • Can you imagine a world without berries, apples, oranges or almonds? Hardly! But without honeybees, butterflies, ants and other pollinators to keep a healthy ecosystem in place, it could happen.

    In fact, research shows that for every three bites of food, one is the result of the work of pollinators.

    So if you’ve ever wondered what pollinator – friendly gardens are all about – or why you should have one – here?s the FYI on a DIY pollinator garden.


    All flowering plants require pollination in order to reproduce. Pollinators help by transferring pollen from the male anther of a plant to the female stigma so that fertilization and seed production occur.

    Some plant species don’t need help with the pollination process. These are known as self-pollinators. Others do fine with a little pollination help from wind or water.

    But certain fruits and seeds, such as blueberries, wild strawberries and sunflower seeds, require help from insect or vertebrate pollinators, such as hummingbirds, beetles and bees.

    Problems & Perils

    Unfortunately, both insect and animal pollinators are in decline.

    Scientists theorize that aggressive growth of invasive species, disease, lack of nutrition, misuse of pesticides, and loss of natural habitat may be the cause of pollinator decline.

    What You Can Do

    The good news is that every one of us can help increase the pollinator population and promote pollinator diversity by doing these three simple things.


Plant a pollinator-friendly garden.

The best way to attract pollinators is to provide nectar and pollen sources by planting clusters of flowering plants.

Pick plants with different colors and shapes to bring more types of pollinators to your garden. To start plants off right, use a 50:50 mix of native soil and Miracle-Gro® Garden Soil.

Choose a variety of plants to ensure continuous bloom cycle, providing spring-to-fall food and nectar.

Plant native plants when possible because they require fewer pesticides than non-native plants. Talk to your local nursery or cooperative extension agency about which plants are best for your region.

Protect plants from mites, whiteflies, aphids and more with Miracle-Gro® Nature’s Care® Garden Insect Control.


Create habitats and shelters.

Pollinators need nesting sites so make sure your lawn and garden both have ample options.

Leave undisturbed areas at yard perimeters, including grassy areas and dead tree limbs, if possible.

Put out a birdbath or other clean water source to lessen pollinator stress and travel time.

Set up bee blocks by drilling various sized holes into preservative-free wood blocks.

Plant an array of colorful flower shapes and varieties to attract a diverse collection of pollinators.

Keep nesting materials available throughout your yard, including leaves, petals, moss and mud


Use pesticides correctly.

Control products have their place-it’s the misuse of them that can impact the pollinator population. Here are some tips for proper pesticide use.

Let native predators help manage your pest problem.

Always read and follow package instructions, including application amount and timing.

Choose the right kind of product to deal with your pest problem, but let natural predators like praying mantids handle such pests as moths and mosquitos.

Keep control products away from water and sensitive habitats.

Learn more about regulatory compliance and Scotts® product responsibility.

02 Jun 2016
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Utah Top 10 Essential Lawn Care Tips

Now that the summer is getting away from us, your lawn is under attack from the hot summer sun, insects, and of course foot traffic from entertaining guests and kids playing. While the summer may be ending in a few months, your lawn still has many more months of looking beautiful. Whether you have a sprawling estate with extensive landscaping or you live in an urban neighborhood with more shrubbery than lawn, there are always lawn care tips that can help your outdoor home. Keep your curb appeal looking great and your lawn looking beautiful with these 10 tips to keep it looking fresh through the late summer season.  

1. Assess your lawn type and geographic location:

Determine what type of lawn you have before you start reading up on what type of lawncare to perform. In many countries like the United States you can look at the Plant Zone for your state and municipality. This will help you determine what is the growing season for your lawn as well as shrubbery and landscaping. It will also show you information for watering, soil, and lighting requirements for your geographic location.

exterior ideas landscaping mulch

What type of lawn care is right for your geographical location?

2. Look to your own lawn and landscaping for signs of distress:

Once you have determined your plant zone it is now time to look at the climate of your own lawn. Late summer usually means hotter sunrays for longer portions of the day. Monitor your grass to see if certain spots are lacking water or are getting attacked by seasonal bugs or even disease. Consider hiring a lawncare service in your area if you’re unfamiliar with local distress conditions your landscaping can endure. Shade trees, overhangs off of your home, and shade from your home could help plants that are in distress from the sun, while those that are not shielded should be hearty plants.

3.  Don’t have a lawn? But prefer landscaping – here’s some tips:

For many homes, especially those in the suburbs or areas that have more hardscape than sprawling lawns – shrubbery and flowers are a great option to still soften your outdoor home with texture. Look to your local nurseries for plants that thrive in direct sun or in semi-shaded areas to plant closer to your home. Look for shrubbery that can withstand the climate year-around, not just the summer heat. This will ensure your plants will remain throughout the year. Flowering shrubbery is a great alternative to grass lawns, as they provide a different “show” of color through the entire year.

exterior ideas home without lawn flowers

Don’t have a lawn, shrubbery and colorful flowers need care too.

4. Get your soil tested if you’re concerned:

If you are noticing your lawn isn’t growing or behaving like your neighbors it could mean many factors. A lawn care service can perform a soil test or conduct other methods to improve your lawn. Your immediate soil around your home could be lacking the right nutrients, PH levels and other natural balances, required for healthy grass root development. Your soil could need aerating, cultivation on a periodic basis or loosening. This helps bring air into your soil and can help lawns that are need of increased growth stimulation and healthy nutrients.

5. Solve next season’s issues now, in the late summer

While you may not realize it your lawn goes through cycles and all of the work you do now, may not show its outcome until next season, if not next year. Therefore, prepare your later summer lawn in preparation for the seasons to come. Many late summer pests such as chinch bugs, mole crickets, and ants are common in very hot climates. Every homeowner has their own way of treating pests: chemicals, natural solutions and other remedies are common. Whichever you choose, take control at the first signs of problems. Brown spots, thinning grass and chewed blades of grass are signs of pests that can ruin your lawn for next season.

exterior ideas lawncare maintenance

Look to your local nursery or home improvement garden center for local lawn advice.

6.  Choosing the right fertilizer for late summer lawns

Your late summer lawn needs different fertilizer than the fall or winter lawns. Depending on if you have are trying to build turf or you are in need of a fertilizer that will solve a particular problem will be dependent on your location, condition of your grass and other local factors. Visit your local nursery or home improvement store and take pictures of your lawn’s problem spots and they can help you find the right fertilizer for your outdoor home. A generic ‘weed and feed’ variety may be right for your neighbors, but you could need pest control – so seek advice before buying and spreading your fertilizer.

7. Rustic appeal for your landscaped outdoor home 

For many homeowners who have a naturally landscaped theme around their home, a lawn may not be of concern. Wild flowers and shrubbery should still be trimmed and kept tidy to preserve a well-manicured look in your outdoor home. Determine if your outdoor home will have mulch and gravel beds closer to your home and wild flowers and shrubbery further away from your home. This will help you maintain the intent of your outdoor home, without having to run out and trim your plants constantly.

exterior ideas rustic landscaping

A rustic outdoor home needs summer upkeep too!

8. Ensure you are mowing your lawn correctly

While you may not think that mowing your lawn can have any effect on the growth of your grass or its health, think again. Mowing your lawn with a dull blade lawnmower can shred the tops of grass and leave it looking bad and unkept. Grass that is cut to low can result in too much sun reaching your lawns roots and cause it to burn. Similarly to a human with short hair not wearing a hat during direct sunrays – the same is true when cutting or “scalping” your grass too short. Ensure your lawnmower is set on the correct height setting for your lawn.

9. Excessive dead grass can result in unhealthy grass

If your lawn has dead grass that has accumulated in thickness, it could need dethatching or raking to remove the accumulated dead grass or “hay”. This will allow air and sunlight to reach down into your healthy grass to promote healthy growth stimulation.  Consult a lawn service professional if you are unsure of how much thatch to remove. In the colder winter months, thatch can help protect the roots – so ensure you examine what stage your grass is in during the late summer season.

exterior ideas small lawn hardscape

Even if your lawn is small, learn what tips will help it look good into next season

10. Your hands are often the best tools for your lawn

If you are experiencing occasional weeds around your late summer lawn, bend down and pull them by hand. Pulling up weeds from the root will remove the entire plant as opposed to mowing over them and just clipping off the heads. Your lawn will look much better if you walk through it several times a week and pull stray weeds, instead of solely relying on fertilizer and other chemical-based products.

Your lawn can look gorgeous this season – use these helpful tips for your late summer outdoor landscaping.
Article compliments of Freshhome

26 May 2016
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Lawn and Landscaping Tips

Summer Lawn and Landscaping Tips

One of the most challenging seasons for growing plants and maintaining lawns is during the summer. As the temperatures rise, plants begin to wither and soil starts to dry. Worse, some cities and communities impose water restrictions making lawn soil and plant hydration more difficult.

If this continues, plants, flowers, trees, lawns and gardens may undergo severe and irreparable damages. It is therefore essential to create precautions and implement wise watering measures to keep your lawn and plants alive during this season.

At-Risk Plants

Although all plants are affected by this hot and dry weather, there are those that would suffer severe damages especially when left unattended in a drought. Determine any that are highly at risk and have them on top of your priority list. Examples are as follows:

  • Newly planted trees and shrubs
  • Newly planted perennials
  • Flower beds
  • Dehydration Symptoms


Evaluate your lawn and plants and search for early signs of dehydration. It is very important to attend to your lawn and plants’ immediate water needs. The most common sign of dehydration is wilting; however, some may show the following symptoms in addition:

  • Bluish-green color foliage
  • Upward curling of grass blades and leaves
  • Yellowing of leaf
  • Translucent leaves
  • Shriveled leaf sections
  • Browning of leaf edges
  • Premature blossom drop
  • Slow growth
  • Stems keel over

Watering Tips

The best thing to keep your lawn and plants alive and hydrated is of course to water them. Here are some watering tips that would help maximize your watering efficiency during this hot season. Consider the following:

Know your community’s water restrictions. Cities and communities have imposed water restrictions as a response to water shortages. Although this can be tough on your plants and lawns, it’s best to follow these restrictions to avoid costly problems. First, know the details of your water restrictions – know how many times a week are you allowed to water your lawn, for how long and at what time.

Water early in the morning. Although plants and lawns can be watered any time of the day, it is still more efficient to water them early in the morning. When you use sprinklers, some water evaporates even before reaching the ground. Given the hot conditions during the summer months, the lost amount of water can be significant to your lawn. But when you water your lawn early in the morning, the least amount of water is lost through evaporation.

Watering your lawn and plants in the evening could also work, however, it would encourage the development of plant diseases such as moss.

Water at the early signs of dehydration.  Don’t let the heat take its toll on your lawn. Don’t wait for your plants to get severe damages before you water them. Water at the early signs of dehydration. This is when leaves and grasses are still green but turns dull and yellowish at the edges and margins. Also, when watering, remember to do it evenly.

Water deeply but less frequently. Roots have the tendency to follow water. If you frequently water your lawn and plants shallowly, the roots tend to collect up near the top of the soil surface. This makes them vulnerable to hot weather. Most shallow roots get baked at the end of the summer season. To prevent this, water your lawn and plants deeply but less frequently. Encourage deep root growth but at the same time, make sure that you apply sufficient water to penetrate root zones. Here are some tips to consider:

  • Apply 1 gallon of water per 1 foot of root zone once a week. (Although this may vary according to soil type and plant or lawn type).
  • Larger plants have larger root zones. Usually, their roots expand to a width of at least equal to their plant height.
  • Lawns usually need 1 inch of water every week. However, during hot seasons, they can still survive with about ½ inch of water.
  • Re-water sandy soils sooner than clay-rich soils
  • Apply water around the base of flowers, vegetables and herbs so that water infiltrates into the root zones.

Avoid runoff. Runoffs are a waste of water. Create necessary adjustments and make sure that your sprinklers are aimed at the lawn or plant beds. Also, closely monitor your lawn and plant beds during watering. If you see that it begins to runoff even before you’ve given a deep watering, turn off your sprinklers for a while and let your lawn turf and plants absorb the water. You may then continue watering as necessary.

As much as possible, avoid overhead watering devices. Viable watering device alternatives are slow soakers, drip hoses and small sprinklers. They distribute water closely to the ground, reaching the root zone of your lawn and plants more efficiently.

Some Useful Tips to Remember

Here are some valuable lawn care tips that you might want to consider.

  • If footprints appear longer on the lawn, your lawn turf needs watering.
  • Squeeze a handful of soil into a ball. If it is damp and holds its shape, the soil is adequately watered. If you can squeeze out water from the soil, it is overwatered.
  • Consider aerating your lawns once a year to enhance soil penetration rate and minimize runoff problems.
  • Spray plants with water during daytime to avoid spider mites development. Drought and heat encourage spider mites infestations.
  • Mulch around plants to prevent weed growth. It also helps in retaining soil nutrients and moisture.
  • Remove weeds as they compete with water and nutrients.

Don’t get too stressed when summer comes. Be a wise homeowner and find viable solutions to keep your plants and lawn healthy throughout the hot season.

How to Water Your Lawn and Install a Drip Irrigation System

Of course, with the proper sprinkler system in place it’s even easier to beat the summer weather and keep your lawn and landscaping plants looking good.

18 Apr 2016
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Spring Color

The trees have flowered and gone to leaf, lining the streets and filling our yards with shades of green to keep us cool in the upcoming summer months. To keep your yard filled with color through the growing season it’s time to place perennials and prepare annual beds.

Color can make a strong impact in a landscape if placed strategically around the yard. Choose areas that will be seen by cars passing by or neighbors taking a late afternoon stroll down the street. Dress up areas near the driveway and make a statement that creates a welcoming entrance to your home. Add drifts of color along your walkway that will cheerfully lead people to your door. The annual and perennial garden is something that should not be left for others to only enjoy. Add splashes of color around your patio area making the space more inviting and intriguing to those enjoying the outdoors.

The many nooks around the typical yard can be planted and enjoyed by a homeowner through a window or while out in the yard. There is more than one way to exploit the beauty of the annual flower. Many people like to plant them in the ground but others prefer to make them mobile and move them around the landscape. This option allows you to create change in the landscape as the growing season moves towards fall. Annuals are a perfect match for summer pots.

There are a variety of pots from large ceramic urns to small and bright colored containers. Use these to add color, interest, and draw attention to the plants placed within. Hanging baskets are another option to brighten your yard and home. There are a variety of new and old favorites that will add spectacular color around a landscape. Baskets, like pots, come with a range of options. Use large hanging baskets to frame an entry or place small baskets to adorn a patio for a gathering. The options for hanging basket use are great and the display provided will be vast. Don’t forget about window boxes. Many people enjoy seeing a display of color at the base of their windows. With shades partially open color can still be seen from inside the house while maintaining privacy if sought. This type of treatment to a house makes a visual display for both the homeowner and people passing by, while adding color at a level in the landscape that will be seen by many. Now that you’ve considered the options for your color it’s time to prepare the space in which they will be established.

The first step when preparing a planting bed is to choose a space and begin clearing out the area. With a good rake remove any existing plant litter, preparing the site for soil amendments. If possible, till up the native earth loosening the soil which prepares it for the addition of organic nutrients. Spread a four inch layer of a good compost material such as mushroom compost or Kelloggs Amend and blend it into the native soil. You should have a deep colored soil left behind that is now ready for the annuals and perennials to be planted. You will undoubtedly encounter many rocks; if you have the patience, remove as many as possible to make future digging easier.

When placing the plants in the newly prepared flower bed arrange them in large groups by type. This will create waves of flowers and be more interesting and pleasing to the eye. Don’t be afraid to mix colors but try to be consistent throughout your landscape when choosing your plant color palette. This will create the most visual impact in your yard. Consider the coming months when choosing your flowering plants and pick varieties that will bloom at various times and throughout the growing season. This will allow you to have a wonderful display from spring through fall. For the best selection of the latest cultivars and colors, visit an independent nursery garden center where the staff is knowledgeable and has experience with the peculiar challenges of high desert gardening in greater Reno-Tahoe. You’ll get sound advice on what will work best for your particular needs and how to maintain what you select. Or, if you prefer, just wonder through the aisles and discover the new colors and varieties of plants that you can use to create your new annual and perennial beds.

11 Apr 2016
ACG Sprinklers - Utah SLC / Ogden - Lawn Care, Landscaping, Snow Removal

Roses are red… Violets are blue.

Roses have a reputation for being difficult to care for, but with the correct amount of water and sunlight and a little bit of grooming, your roses should thrive. Explore these basics of caring for your roses — but if you forget or muff something, the plants are surprisingly forgiving:

[Credit: ©]

Credit: ©
  • Watering roses: The rule of thumb is to make sure roses get about 2 inches a week. Deep soakings are much better than frequent, shallow waterings. Set the hose at the foot of the rose and let water trickle in. Or if you have a big bed of roses or roses and companions, use a soaker hose or install an in-ground system.

  • Fertilizing roses: Use an all-purpose garden fertilizer, because it has balanced amounts of N (nitrogen), P (phosphorus), and K (potassium). Fertilizers touted especially for roses — such as Rose Food — are fine but not mandatory. In spring, as the plant emerges from dormancy, you can water with a tablespoon of Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) dissolved in a gallon of water to promote strong canes.

    Always water before applying fertilizer so the plant is plumped up and under no stress.

  • Grooming roses: Using sharp clippers, you can spruce up your rosebushes whenever something unattractive about the plant catches your critical eye.

    Here’s stuff you can cut out any time you see it:

    • Dead wood: Remove dead canes down to the ground level.

    • Damaged wood: Cut it back into about 1 inch of healthy wood.

    • Misplaced stems: Take off stems that are rubbing together (choose one and spare the other), stems that are taking off in the wrong direction, and stems that are trailing on the ground.

    • Suckers: In a grafted plant, these errant canes emerge from below the graft union (the bulge at the base of the bush). The suckers look different from the rest of the bush — they’re often smoother, straighter, and lighter in color. Another clue: They sprout leaves and occasionally mongrel flowers that look nothing like the main bush.

  • Deadheading and tidying up roses: The plant looks better when you get rid of spent flowers. Also, because the goal of all flowering plants is to stop flowering and produce seed (in the case of rosebushes, to make rose hips), deadheading thwarts the process. So the plant is fooled into making more flowers. Deadhead away!

    Whenever you see badly damaged, diseased, or dead leaves, remove them. To be on the safe side, throw them in the trash rather than in the compost pile. Otherwise, the leaves may spread disease.

  • Pruning roses: Early spring is the best time to prune. If it’s still winter, your overeager cuts may lead to frost damage. Pruning is pretty straightforward: Remove all non-negotiable growth, thin the plants, and then shape them.

Experts advise cutting 1/4 inch above a bud eye so the bud eye doesn’t dry out.

Use clean, sharp clippers, and cut at a 45-degree angle. Cut near a <i>bud eye,</i> the tiny browni